Pas à pas : Pique à cheveux – Par Armelle Burbaud

11187278_959719057406326_1372315045250571755_oJe suis très inspirée par l’Art nouveau en ce moment. Je trouve que ce style convient très bien aux
pâtes de métal et en particulier au bronze, métal que j’adore et qui a été beaucoup utilisé durant cette période. J’ai notamment fait plusieurs peignes et piques à cheveux inspirés par ce style. Voici le pas
à pas de la toute dernière pique que j’ai faite, pour laquelle j’ai utilisé un décor un peu différent lors
de la réalisation des photos de ce tutoriel.

 

Art Deco Inspired Hair Pin- by Armelle Burbaud

11174505_959719010739664_2806298429348475949_oMy present inspiration comes from the Art Nouveau period/movement. I find that this style is very suited for metal clays, in particular bronze, which I love and which was very frequently used during this period. I have made many combs and hair sticks inspired by Art Nouveau. Here is the step-by-step of my latest hair-pin.

(Translation from French by Angela Crispin)

 

Ancient Copper Medallion By Gail Lannum

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Inspired by ancient medallions that have survived centuries, artist Gail Lannum shows how to create a brass component that is sure to shine in your jewelery creations!

The “Oh!” Cone Ring By Angela Crispin

Crispin_Oh!RingHand Crispin_Oh!RingOpen The “Oh!” cone ring by Angela Crispin appeared in our very first issue of Metal Clay Artist magazine.  We were delighted to see Angela’s ring go on to win a Saul Bell Design Award.
It is only fitting to re-launch our project pages under the sponsorship of Mitsubishi Materials Trading Corporation with this elegant project.

Project and Images by Angela Crispin.
Editing by Margaret Schindel and Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

Lava Ring by Angela Baduel-Crispin

This unisex ring has a slightly rough, masculine look and can be a great gift for a man. It has a firing temperature adapted to allow Art Clay™ copper to sinter while being fired together with fine silver, in a way that is safe for both metals. 

The advantage of using a commercial fine silver ring liner is that it guarantees strength and avoids direct skin contact with the copper when the ring is worn. Using a manufactured ring liner instead of making your own fine silver flared ring shank also saves you time.

A fired silver clay ring shank can be used, if you prefer, but it should be sturdy and fired for 2 hours at 900°C regardless of the brand of clay used.
It is important to fire only unequal amounts of copper and silver (i.e. unequal mass), because firing copper and silver of equal mass together tends to make them alloy (see “Caution” at the end of this article).

Co-firing silver and copper clays: In general, it is possible to fire copper and low fire silver clays together successfully as long as they are not in equal amounts (so they don’t alloy) and as long as the temperature is adjusted to suit both clays. For silver ring shanks, however, co-firing silver and copper clays is not recommended. The short (30 minute) firing time required for the copper clay, which helps to reduce oxide build-up, can compromise the strength of the silver clay band (which should be fired for a full 2 hours at 1650°F), while firing the copper clay for longer than 30 minutes produces a thicker layer of copper oxides on the surface, reducing the thickness and strength of the copper metal after the oxides are removed.

Video Tour: Rio Grande

Did you know that Rio Grande manufactures nearly 5,000 findings, tools and equipment products at their solar-powered facility in Albuquerque, NM, USA?  Many people mistakenly think that they are a wholesaler of imported goods.  A few years ago, while at the Sante Fe Symposium I had the opportunity to have a tour of Rio Grande.  In the video below you can a peek inside their manufacturing areas.  And since this is the last year of the jewellery symposium, I’d urge you to think about going if you are a jewellery maker. It is a wealth of information. http://www.santafesymposium.org/

 

Artist Profile: Martha Biggar by Julia Rai

I always think of Virginia based metal clay teacher and artist Martha Biggar as part of a team – Ed and Martha go together like ham and eggs – for the US readers – or tea and crumpets as we say in the UK! I’ve called her a ‘metal clay teacher and artist’ but Martha describes herself slightly differently. “I usually think of myself as an artist/educator/farmer, but maybe renaissance woman would be better…” she told me.

It’s not often that I meet someone who still lives within a stone’s throw of where they were brought up, but Martha is an exception. “I grew up on the family farm that touches the one we own today in Draper, VA,” she began. “My husband Ed, a glassblower, and I travel and teach both glass and jewelry.  Although I sold my cow herd in 2013, we still have donkeys, horses, and a couple mules.  We raise specialized vegetables for the farmers markets and chefs in our area, including figs, asparagus, and assorted varieties of cherry tomatoes.”

Not surprisingly, her first memories of being creative involve animals. “My earliest memories involve drawing horses as a very young child,” she said. I asked her how she discovered metal clay. “I taught middle school art in our county, and as is required in Virginia, I had to take classes every five years at least in my field. Since I didn’t want to write reports, I generally went to Arrowmont in Tennessee, where I took my first class in metal clay in 2000 from Linda Kaye-Moses. I had seen metal clay advertised by Rio Grande and wondered about it but was concerned about the cost of a kiln. So, I figured I would try it out and see if I liked it. If I didn’t, my family would have a vacation and I would have Christmas presents. But I did, and promptly went home and purchased a kiln. My first piece was a 1-inch square that Linda always taught to beginners, I still have it.” I guess it was a lean Christmas that year! Continue reading…

Artist Project Series: Une Bague Paon par Armelle Burbaud

Cool Tools et Creative Fire ont le plaisir de présenter un autre projet de notre série d’œuvres de maîtres artistes. Ce tutoriel est un magnifique une bague paon par Armelle Burbaud.

   Bague « Paon »

J’aime beaucoup sculpter des oiseaux, à la fois parce que je les trouve émouvants et parce qu’ils sont un joli prétexte à créer du mouvement. Et comme  j’adore passer des heures à fignoler la gravure et creuser la pâte avec un scalpel pour voir apparaître le frémissement de leurs plumes – et que j’adore les bagues …  voici un pas à pas qui m’a permis de lier ces deux passions : une bague paon !

Continue reading…

Artist Project Series: Ann Davis “Columns” Pendant

[Cool Tools and Creative Fire are pleased to present another project in our ongoing “Artist Project Series”. This time master artist Ann Davis took up our challenge to design a unique tutorial using FS999.  Thank you Ann for your creative and fun project!]

The mystery and mystique of columns seems to infuse all parts of human history. Sumerians had them, Minoans had them, just about everyone did. There are even some Stone Age columns, admittedly more lithic, rectangular, or kind of ax shaped at Gobekli Tepe.  So they kind of started out stone and then were wood or whole trees turned upside down and planted in holes. Premium stone eventually replaced wood ones, fluted columns are said to simulate tree bark. The representations of columns on early Minoan seal rings, have people dancing around them, makes you think of Maypoles:) The Greeks and Romans took it to the next level, erecting victory columns, highly decorated with statues of heroes on the top. Columns are said to represent the bridge between heaven and earth, important buildings, shrines, and the Egyptian Djed pillar, stability and the spinal column. To me the column represents knowledge, written records, ancient alphabets.

There are so many  archeological sites with columns, standing, fallen, broken. I really like the broken ones, they speak to me of past civilizations. Something epic enough happened to break a column. Makes you wonder. I love a good mystery!

I have 4 fluted and twisted columns holding  glass shelves in my living room.  There are two columns on an antique linen cabinet complete with brass finals, along with 2 brass Nikes in my dining room. I also chose a Doric column to replace the old wrought Iron trellis on my front porch, it supports a Trumpet Vine that spirals up to the roof, the August humming bird’s delight!  Did I do all that on purpose…no not really it just happened, apparently I love a good column. Continue reading…

Artist Project Series: The Tree of Tolerance by Trish Jeffers-Zeh

Cool Tools and Creative Fire are pleased to present a new tutorial by Master Artist Trish Jeffers-Zeh.  This in-depth project is both an artistic and creative soul journey.

“Resolve to be tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and the wrong. Sometime in life you will have been all of these.” ― George Washington Carver

My work and designs are highly influenced by my need to find peace in an often hectic and uncompromising world.  Hence, I headed into the studio, followed my intuition and “The Tree of Tolerance” was born.

At first, I had a totally different design in mind. However, once I sat at my bench gazing outside, the stately Elm tree in my front yard drew my attention.  After all, it would be her leaves, skeletonized and carefully collected by me for their lacey, intricate beauty of imperfection.  They were to be central as my bail, texture, and theme for the ceramic pendant.  When I am creating to release my worries, it becomes a meditation or prayer.  It is at these times I let go and trust my intuition.  The works that manifest while under this influence are most often admired by others and are prime examples of my yearning to grow past the techniques I have learned.

The elm is often associated with Mother and Earth Goddess, strength, communication, relationships and its essence energizes the mind and balances the heart.  It attracts love, protects and aids in sharpening intuitive instincts.  Elm is the arbitrator that listens without judgement.  Most mature elms of European and American origin have died from Dutch elm disease, even though they had a long history for their tolerance to thrive wherever they were planted.  Thankfully disease resistant cultivars have been developed that are as tolerant to various growing conditions as their forbearers were before the dreaded disease.  The Tree of Tolerance represents the seed that I hope is cultivated in all of us so that we may lead with compassion. Continue reading…