Ancient Copper Medallion By Gail Lannum

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Inspired by ancient medallions that have survived centuries, artist Gail Lannum shows how to create a brass component that is sure to shine in your jewelery creations!

The “Oh!” Cone Ring By Angela Crispin

Crispin_Oh!RingHand Crispin_Oh!RingOpen The “Oh!” cone ring by Angela Crispin appeared in our very first issue of Metal Clay Artist magazine.  We were delighted to see Angela’s ring go on to win a Saul Bell Design Award.
It is only fitting to re-launch our project pages under the sponsorship of Mitsubishi Materials Trading Corporation with this elegant project.

Project and Images by Angela Crispin.
Editing by Margaret Schindel and Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

Lava Ring by Angela Baduel-Crispin

This unisex ring has a slightly rough, masculine look and can be a great gift for a man. It has a firing temperature adapted to allow Art Clay™ copper to sinter while being fired together with fine silver, in a way that is safe for both metals. 

The advantage of using a commercial fine silver ring liner is that it guarantees strength and avoids direct skin contact with the copper when the ring is worn. Using a manufactured ring liner instead of making your own fine silver flared ring shank also saves you time.

A fired silver clay ring shank can be used, if you prefer, but it should be sturdy and fired for 2 hours at 900°C regardless of the brand of clay used.
It is important to fire only unequal amounts of copper and silver (i.e. unequal mass), because firing copper and silver of equal mass together tends to make them alloy (see “Caution” at the end of this article).

Co-firing silver and copper clays: In general, it is possible to fire copper and low fire silver clays together successfully as long as they are not in equal amounts (so they don’t alloy) and as long as the temperature is adjusted to suit both clays. For silver ring shanks, however, co-firing silver and copper clays is not recommended. The short (30 minute) firing time required for the copper clay, which helps to reduce oxide build-up, can compromise the strength of the silver clay band (which should be fired for a full 2 hours at 1650°F), while firing the copper clay for longer than 30 minutes produces a thicker layer of copper oxides on the surface, reducing the thickness and strength of the copper metal after the oxides are removed.

Artist Project Series: Iwona Tamborska

The 3 Fish

This is the 5th project in our ongoing series of tutorials sponsored by Cool Tools.  All projects use their new silver metal clay EZ960™ Sterling Silver. This project is quite advanced, however, artists of all levels will learn something new! Be inspired by the way Iwona uses a drawing for the plan and layout of her pieces, or by her use of colour as she adds stones and coloured paste to this project!  Those who want to learn about hollow forms can follow along and learn about using a burn out media.  This beautiful pendant is wearable sculpture! Continue reading…

Metal Clay 101 – Firing Metal Clay – by Katherine Prejean

Depending on the type of metal clay you are using, from original fine silver to base metal clays, there are a number of options for firing. This may include anything from a kiln to a simple hand-held torch.

One of the processes of creating jewelry with silver metal clay that got me addicted was the ability to use a something as simple as a butane torch for firing. In as little time as two minutes, I could have a beautiful pair of earrings or a pendant ready to wear.

TORCH FIRING — —

When teaching a beginner class, I only demonstrate torch firing as a way to help the students understand how easy it is to set up your metal clay studio with minimal cost. Continue reading…