PMC Presents: Wendy Wallin Malinow

Honey Bee Brooch

I first fell in love with Wendy’s work when I saw it in an ad showing her Saul Bell Design Award necklace in 2010.  Her necklace had so many interesting parts and it told a story.  Over the years Wendy’s work has evolved and become more sophisticated.  Her necklace (shown above) “Thorn Bird” was a finalist piece in 2017. Wendy created a companion brooch and is sharing her process with us. This project is presented by PMC Connection.

To begin her project, Wendy sketched ideas.
The brooch and the necklace pendant compliment each other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PMC Presents: SCROLLED SYRINGE EARRINGS By Roxan Waluk

Syringe clay is a fun and whimsical way to add delicacy and design interest to your work. Unfortunately, most of the metal clay artists I know seem to be adverse to working with syringe clay because it can be difficult to control. It’s true for me too! However, using the water brush method described below, most imperfections in application can be easily corrected so don’t limit your possibilities. Syringe away!!


At the end of the article, Roxan has included several images of her syringe work for inspiration! With thanks to Mitsubishi Trading Materials and PMC Connection for sponsoring this special series of projects.

PMC PRESENTS: Fleur de lis Necklace by Kris Kramer

My creations need to hold meaning for me, which is why this necklace has a hand-drawn, personalized version of a Fleur de lis. The Fleur de lis has had many meanings over time and in various contexts. To me the flames represent Love on the left, Power on the right, and Wisdom in the middle. The band holding them together signifies each one of us becomes a enlightened sovereign being when these three flame aspects – Love, Power and Wisdom – are in balanced.

You can make this necklace with whatever design you choose; that is, you do not have to use a Fleur de lis. And do select your own texture and doming shape(s).

It is helpful if you have a clear image in your mind and better yet a sketch. It matters not if your creation turns out like your sketch. For me, just looking at the sketch I begin to understand how I will need to construct the piece and if there are any obstacles to do so.

 

 

 

 

Firing Glass & White Bronze Clay by Carrie Story

Firing glass with bronze might sound impossible, but it is actually very easy to do. You still need to use carbon to assist the bronze with sintering. So, how do you protect the glass from getting carbon in it?

In this tutorial, I will explain how to build a steel mesh box to place over your glass during firing. This technique allows for limitless design options. And, white bronze is the perfect non-precious metal to use with your glass. It fires in exactly the correct range for adhering the glass to the surface of it.

We will be using Five Star Metal Clay and a two-phase firing schedule.

 

 

English Pendant Ocarina by Carrie Michael

orcana

The ocarina is an instrument that still remains beautiful today but connects us to the very roots of art and music. With this project, I will share how I make a whistle from metal clay, and then tune it to create a musical instrument.

Project: Carrie Michael
Photos and illustrations: Carrie Michael
Editing: Joy Funnell and Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

Bronze Swing Earrings by Cindy Silas

MCAM 4.3_Page_56_Image_0001Combining metal clay and polymer clay in a piece of jewelry is a great way to add color and contrast. To connect the two mediums, it helps to build some sort of connection into the metal clay that will allow the polymer to wrap around it or otherwise grab a foothold. In this pair of earrings metal clay ovals are connected with small blocks of metal clay and once the polymer clay is added the connection is hidden. I’ve used bronze clay but you can use any type of metal clay.

Collagraphic Texture Sheets by Cindy Miller

MCAM 2.3_Page_77_Image_0003Let’s face it: we all love buying new tools, but they sure can put a dent in our wallets. Luckily, you probably already have the makings of unique collagraphic texture sheets as close as your kitchen or studio junk drawer. A collagraphic texture sheet is a collage that has been sealed with a polymer sealer so you can use it with metal clay. These texture sheets are simple to create, and ideas for different textures are limited only by your imagination.

(This pendant was textured with a cheesecloth texture sheet. To create a dramatic effect, only part of the clay was textured.)

 

Step-by-Step Project: Sterling Wedding Band by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

Commissions–to take them or not is a question many artists have to figure out for themselves.  About ten years ago the parents of a friend of mine were celebrating a big anniversary and they wanted new wedding bands.  They came to me to make them. I was flattered and scared. The rings turned out well and they have been worn everyday for the past decade.  My friends’ father is a woodworker, gardener, golfer and has worked hard while wearing a fine silver ring…so you can guess that it has been pretty beaten up.  It was flattened and reshaped at one point which work-hardened a few spots.  Over time these spots weakened.  He asked if I could solder the opening.  I figured it would be much better to remake the ring in a stronger sterling silver metal clay.  So here I am with a ring I made over a decade ago–and I need to remake it– “Exactly the same. The fit and shape are perfect.” (Pictured is the old ring and the old texture plate.)

1The first thing I had to do was find the texture sheet I used over a decade ago….in another studio!  My studio moved from a shop I had downtown to my garage–then was cleaned out last summer.  Oy!  I remember finding the old texture sheets and tossing them.  But did I toss them in a “maybe I’ll teach metal clay again someday bin” or in the garbage?  It took me a few hours to find them…but I had them.  Whew!  “Exactly the same” rang in my head!  So here we go…I documented remaking this simple ring band so that you can follow along.

Project: Miniature Jugs In Silver Metal Clay by Sue Heaser

1.2 extract images_Page_28_Image_0001aI always have loved jugs and I have a much-loved collection of milk jugs in all shapes and sizes. It was natural that I should want to make miniature jugs in pure silver! The project instructions will make a jug about ½” (13mm) high,which is equivalent to 6” (15cm) tall in the standard dollhouse scale of 1:12. These little jugs also look wonderful hanging on a charm bracelet.

The secret to sculpting small miniatures in metal clay is to make the rough shape of the object in fresh clay, dry it, and then refine the shape with sanding, repairing imperfections with paste as necessary.

 

 

Artist Project Series: Penannular Brooch by Julia Rai

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Cool Tools is proud to present the next artist project in our series.  This time UK artist Julia Rai presents her artistic talents using EZ960™ Sterling Silver Clay.

Julia Rai has been a contributor to Creative Fire (Metal Clay Artist Magazine) since 2009.  We are thrilled to feature her latest project.

“Penannular style brooches have been used to fasten clothing since the late Iron Age. This style of brooch has a loop of metal with terminals or flattened ends and a moveable pin. The pin is pushed through the fabric and the end of the ring goes under the sharp end of the pin. The ring is then turned locking the pin in place. There are a wide variety of designs for the terminals of historical penannular brooches and this is where the fun comes in on this modern take on an ancient design.

I have used a natural theme for the hoop, texturing it to resemble bark. The terminals use pod, fungi and lichen forms and this is echoed on the curve of the pin.”

Tools and Materials

  • 25g EZ960™ Sterling Silver Clay
  • Thick paste – any silver clay type will do or make some using scraps of EZ960
  • Syringe – any silver clay type will do
  • Liver of sulphur
  • Extruder with tube making attachment
  • Snake roller
  • Craft knife
  • Cocktail sticks
  • Pointed small clay shaper
  • Tweezers
  • Oil
  • Paintbrush
  • Sanding pads
  • Polishing pads/papers/cloths
  • Vermiculite and stainless steel container
  • Half round pliers

Step 1

Using an extruder with a tube making attachment allows you to easily form a tube for the hoop. This makes the brooch lighter and saves on the amount of material used to make the hoop. Choose a round die which is 3-4mm larger than the central rod on the disc that makes the hole. My die is 5mm in diameter and the rod is 1.5mm in diameter.

Step 2

Oil the inside of the extruder barrel, the die and the hole making disc. Put a large lump of clay into the barrel, assemble the tube maker and screw on the end. Turn the handle and extrude a long tube. Cut it off the extruder with a sharp knife. Form this into a hoop the size you want it and trim off the ends. My hoop has two downward facing terminals but you could also have the gap wider and have the terminals facing each other. Allow this to dry.

Step 3

Trim the ends of the hoop so they are angled facing forward. This will allow the embellishments to face forward when they are added. Using a pointed craft knife, thin out the walls of the terminals from the inside being careful not to go too thin and break the ends.

Step 4

Texture the hoop using thick paste. Drag a cocktail stick in random lines through the paste to form bark like patterns. Do this in small sections on one side so the paste does not dry out before you have made the lines. Allow one side to dry, then turn it over and texture the other side the same way. Make sure the hoop is covered on all sides.

Step 5

To make the pin use a snake roller or a CD case and start with a sausage of clay on a non-oiled surface. Roll a tapered snake thinner than the hoop at the thickest end. It needs to be long enough to be bent over the hoop with the potential to almost touch without restricting movement around the hoop. The sharper end should protrude beyond the gap in the hoop, how long that is depends on your design.

Step 6

Cut the thickest end at an angle and then bend the length so it forms a hook shape with the cut angle facing forward. Embellishment will be added to the flat end to match the terminals. Allow this to dry.

Step 7

When the pin is dry, texture the top and sides of the bend down to the angled end using thick paste and a cocktail stick. Take the texture a little way down the back of the pin but not so far that it will interfere with the action of sliding the pin smoothly through fabric. Do not texture the inside as this will make it difficult for the pin to slide around the hoop smoothly.

Step 8

Take a small ball of clay and form it into a cone shape. Form a pod by pushing a small, pointed clay shaper into the end of the cone and creating an asymmetric aperture with the opening facing forward. Make sure the end of this fits into the hole in the terminal. Form another pod roughly the same size. Allow these to dry and then stick them into the ends of the terminals with thick paste.

Step 9

Make a number of small pod forms using the same method as before. These should be different sizes and shapes to make the overall form interesting. Allow these to dry and then add them to the terminals around the larger pod forms and extending up the hoop a little way. Tweezers help to place these small, fiddly forms. The aim is to cover the transition between the hoop and the main pods so they look like growing forms.

Step 10

Form a number of small balls and poke a dent into each ball with a cocktail stick while they are still wet. Allow these to dry and then stick them into any gaps between pods. Add some paste and cocktail stick texture to the outside of the pods if you like or leave them smooth. Make sure the back gets some embellishment too. When you are happy with the overall design, put it to one side to dry.

Step 11

Use some smaller pod forms and some balls to decorate the front facing part of the pin end and slightly up the bend. Add texture if desired. Use a sanding pad to smooth the pin and sharpen the point. Allow the pin and the hoop to dry thoroughly.

Step 12

Nestle the pieces on a bed of vermiculite or fibre blanket in a stainless steel container. Fire at 1650˚F/900˚C for four hours to ensure the pieces are at maximum strength to bend the pin after firing.

Step 13

Use a brass or steel brush to get into all the nooks and crannies of the pods and texture on the hoop and the pin. Tumble polish to a high shine.

Step 14

Mix up a solution of liver of sulphur with boiling water and dip the hoop and the pin until they are black. Rinse in cold water and then use polishing papers and cloths to shine the high spots of the texture, pods and balls.

Step 15

Assemble the pin on the hoop. Using half round pliers, gently bend the decorated end of the pin so it almost touches the stem but allows free movement around the hoop.

Julia Rai is an award winning artist, teacher and writer well known in the international metal clay community. Her work has featured in a wide range of publications and she writes regularly for print magazines and online. She teaches in her home studio in Cornwall and travels to teach by invitation.

Artist Project Series: Iwona Tamborska

The 3 Fish

This is the 5th project in our ongoing series of tutorials sponsored by Cool Tools.  All projects use their new silver metal clay EZ960™ Sterling Silver. This project is quite advanced, however, artists of all levels will learn something new! Be inspired by the way Iwona uses a drawing for the plan and layout of her pieces, or by her use of colour as she adds stones and coloured paste to this project!  Those who want to learn about hollow forms can follow along and learn about using a burn out media.  This beautiful pendant is wearable sculpture! Continue reading…