Making Modern Electrum, an Experiment by Lynn Cobb

PMC Gold spinning element

Since gold clay is so expensive, might there be a way to combine it with silver clay and still have a finished metal that appeared gold in color, but would be less pure than PMC Gold clay and therefore, a little less expensive?

The ancient Greeks and Romans were aware of such an alloy, which occurred both naturally and man made. They called it “electrum” and used it for coins, jewelry and plating. My reading led me to discover that an alloy of more than about one third silver would result in a metal that appeared silver, that is, no gold color at all. Ancient alloys seemed to be no less than about 20% silver. Therefore, my plan was to combine a variety of gold and silver PMC mixes so that the alloys were in that sweet spot of 20-30% silver, to see what shades of gold would result. Continue reading…

The Challenge of an Art Challenge by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

IMG_3639IMG_3676In January I saw a post by Penny Akester from the U.K. asking for interested artists to participate in a collaborative jewellery project.  I jumped at the chance as I was feeling creative and was up for a challenge.  The idea was to have 3 randomly chosen artists work on a piece of jewellery.  In the challenge I was involved with 3 pieces.  The first piece started with my own materials and idea.  I made an etched aluminum cuff. (Pictured at left.) 

13131417_1093184770727401_3856596614720890021_oMy cuff was mailed to artist Hayley Kruger in the U.K. who in turn cut out pieces of it and added to it using paper, crayons, pespex and ink

13048165_514836378703244_4773527584586649183_o13083174_514836372036578_4706185693448659737_nA third artist, Lisa Welbourn made a necklace from the work of the first two artists. She added sterling silver, silver clay, lava beads, rubber neck cord.  Lisa also decided to combine some of the elements to make them double sided.

A second piece I worked on was started by Joy Funnell.  Can you imagine receiving a fine silver and enameled piece from Joy and you are to “change” it or work on it?  Oh I was a bit scared! It was a beautiful piece!

IMG_4566 (2)My thoughts were to leave it as it and build around it.  So I added it to a leather bracelet.  I attached it with silver wire and class beads and I carved a pattern onto the leather and I coloured the leather to bring out the beautiful blue enamel in Joy’s piece.

13265922_10208796020565321_7355467968641715417_n13247965_10208796020485319_6382875796425232347_oA third artist added silk thread to the holes I made in the leather and added a patina the silver.  I hope the artist who receives this one loves it! Each artist participating in the challenge will get to keep one of the finished pieces!

Now that I’ve finished with my contributions to the project, I’m looking at the finished challenge pieces and I’m wondering if I would do an art challenge again.  YES! Yes I would participate in another collaborative art project. Even though this challenge cost me a lot more than I anticipated–I had not realized we’d work on 3 pieces and that most would need to be mailed to the U.K. (That’s my fault-I signed up for a challenge from the U.K.!) I also had not anticipated how hard it would be.  I sweated a lot trying to come up with an idea for Joy’s piece! (As I’m sure the artist did who received my cuff and then cut it up!)

I now have a greater appreciation for the work (and sweating) that goes into collaborative art pieces.

The “Pass it Along” project organizer Penny Akester has a site set up to show off the completed pieces and explains,  “The project is now just finishing its first run, and there are 55 jewellers from across Europe and America taking part. We have each started a piece, passed it along to the next person for them to add to or adapt it, and then passed it along again so we have each now received a third piece that we now have to complete. The 55 pieces we have created are now completed, and starting to join our online exhibition / gallery space at http://passitalongproject.weebly.com/.”

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Jeannette Froese LeBlanc is the editor of Creative Fire and former editor of Metal Clay Artist Magazine.  She keeps a studio in rural Ontario, Canada and works in etched aluminum and metal clays. You can find her work online www.SassyandStella.com

Product Review: EZ960™ Sterling

25 and 50g large“EZ960™ Sterling” is a new clay launching this week from Cool Tools!  It is another invention by Bill Struve.  Cool Tools and Bill worked together on this new clay and decided to name it “EZ960™ Sterling” which is an easy name to remember. However, if they had asked for my opinion on the name I would have called it, “Easy-Wonderful-Strong-Beautiful-The Metal Clay You’ve Only Dreamed About”.  Maybe that name wouldn’t fit on the labels?

Valerie Bealle EZ960 braceletI feel very privileged to have been in on the testing of this new clay.  Full-disclosure: I love it.

This sterling silver metal clay is open shelf fired in a kiln. Other comparable brands require mixing or firing in activated carbon. This hybrid sterling clay is .960 when fired and can be hallmarked Sterling Silver. Sterling Silver is the industry standard for jewelry and is known for its strength that can withstand everyday wear and tear.

Lisel Rings Group EZ960

Cool Tools, offers 25g and 50g packages http://www.cooltools.us/EZ960-Sterling-Silver-Clay-p/ezs-025-p.htm

Here is my review of the new clay:
WET FORM: Moisture content and workability
:As I waited several weeks to test the clay it may have lost some of its plasticity while in the temporary wrapping. I added a few drops of water and worked it in and found the clay to be beautifully smooth, easy to roll, it picks up texture nicely and joins are solid. (My release agent was olive oil.)

DRY FORM: How was the flexibility, was it easy to carve, sand, join? What an amazing clay to carve! There are no “tears” at the end of a push with a carving tool. Clean edges!

Firing:No blistering or cracking. In my first firing I forgot to support a ring and so it slumped. I was curious about the clay and hammered the ring round and straight–it could take the abuse! All items out of the kiln have the satisfying “clink” of sintered metal and they are a matt grey. Some pieces I hammered and others I tumbled.

Shrinkage:Ring #1-1.5mm thick wet clay, wet clay size: 11.5, dry 10.5 and after firing 9.5,
Ring #2-1.5 mm thick wet clay, wet clay size: 12.5, dry 12 after firing 10.

Rings warped in the firing, as I forgot to support them properly, hammering them brought them back into shape without increasing the size.

Finishing:I hammered some pieces directly out of the kiln and then I tumbled them to finish the polishing. Rings were polished further with a 3m polishing brush and patinaed with LOS.

“Cool” Video to check out with Lisel Crowley. http://www.cooltools.us/EZ960-Sterling-Adjustable-Ring-s/2468.htm

540704_577388125607677_846842341_nJeannette Froese LeBlanc is the editor of Creative Fire and is an avid jewellery designer.  She has worked in metal clay since it first came on the market. You can find her jewellery online: www.SassyandStella.com.

Collagraphic Texture Sheets by Cindy Miller

MCAM 2.3_Page_77_Image_0003Let’s face it: we all love buying new tools, but they sure can put a dent in our wallets. Luckily, you probably already have the makings of unique collagraphic texture sheets as close as your kitchen or studio junk drawer. A collagraphic texture sheet is a collage that has been sealed with a polymer sealer so you can use it with metal clay. These texture sheets are simple to create, and ideas for different textures are limited only by your imagination.

(This pendant was textured with a cheesecloth texture sheet. To create a dramatic effect, only part of the clay was textured.)

 

Metal Clay 101- Paste: “The Thick And The Thin Of It” By Lora Hart

CompletedRepairIt happens to everyone. – both novices and masters. You’re working on a special piece of metal clay, and snap! Something breaks. Or you’re putting together a bead and can’t match the pattern at the seam. Or you simply want to join this element to that one. The most common response to any of these (and a million other) scenarios is to reach for that little pot of slip. Continue reading…

Step-by-Step Project: Sterling Wedding Band by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

Commissions–to take them or not is a question many artists have to figure out for themselves.  About ten years ago the parents of a friend of mine were celebrating a big anniversary and they wanted new wedding bands.  They came to me to make them. I was flattered and scared. The rings turned out well and they have been worn everyday for the past decade.  My friends’ father is a woodworker, gardener, golfer and has worked hard while wearing a fine silver ring…so you can guess that it has been pretty beaten up.  It was flattened and reshaped at one point which work-hardened a few spots.  Over time these spots weakened.  He asked if I could solder the opening.  I figured it would be much better to remake the ring in a stronger sterling silver metal clay.  So here I am with a ring I made over a decade ago–and I need to remake it– “Exactly the same. The fit and shape are perfect.” (Pictured is the old ring and the old texture plate.)

1The first thing I had to do was find the texture sheet I used over a decade ago….in another studio!  My studio moved from a shop I had downtown to my garage–then was cleaned out last summer.  Oy!  I remember finding the old texture sheets and tossing them.  But did I toss them in a “maybe I’ll teach metal clay again someday bin” or in the garbage?  It took me a few hours to find them…but I had them.  Whew!  “Exactly the same” rang in my head!  So here we go…I documented remaking this simple ring band so that you can follow along.

Artist Profile: Véronique Roy Interviewd by Julia Rai

Honeycomb necklace 2

I was introduced to the work of Canadian artist Véronique Roy by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc and as soon as I saw her pieces, I knew this would be an interesting article. There is a simplicity and purity about her work that is so attractive, I really looked forward to learning more about her. Veronique was brought up in Montreal and now lives in a small village in the Laurentians which is a mountainous region in Québec, Canada.

“I consider myself as a creator, a maker and a jeweller. Also a businesswoman!” she told me. Her studio even has a name! “I work from a small workshop on the edge of the forest, in my backyard. To get there, I have to cross a little stream that runs through the land. The workshop was built three years ago, with the help of my friends. As my work was encroaching too much on the living space of the house, it was time for a change and to have an exclusive space for Brelokz (the name of my studio).” How cute is this snowy little house, like something out of a fairy tale?Workshop under the snowa

Véronique has always valued her creative side. “Creativity has always accompanied me in how I see life. When I look at things, my eyes capture details that can escape others at a first glance,” she says. “From the beginning, I felt that metal clay would play a central role in my professional development.” I asked her about her first experience with metal clay. “I discovered metal clay almost six years ago. I attended a training course to learn basic silver clay techniques. I immediately fell in love with this somewhat capricious material which allows working in so many different ways. I remember that my first piece (a pendant) was not at all to my taste, but it was a model that was required for certification in the course.”

I find the organic nature of Véronique’s work really aesthetically pleasing. “My creative process can find its initial spark anywhere! Ideas can germinate without my noticing it. Sometimes when I am taking a walk in the forest, or even when I am reading a newspaper article,” she explained. “Nature is my primary source of inspiration. Besides living in a small village in the countryside surrounded by mountains, I also have a personal interest and a formation in herbalism. These played an important role in paving the way to create jewellery from nature’s textures. One day, I was tending to my garden, and saw a tomato leaf wrapped around my finger, which brought a clear image of a leaf ring! Step by step, I started using leaves for my pieces. The four leaf rings are the first pieces that defined my artistic process. I consider them as the basic image that represents my collections. They capture the essence of nature. Simply.”4 Leaf Bronze Rings

“Initially, I started with medicinal plants thanks to the influence of my herbalist background. Then, I started looking for plant textures suitable for the material. Gradually, I evolved towards other materials, always keeping contact with my initial source of inspiration. Honeycombs found their way to my heart and imagination. Oak bark and coral were to follow. I use the materials as simple and pure as possible, without too much transformation, in order to preserve their primary nature. As a result, the essence of nature is captured in metal, eternally.Bark Bracelet
Honeycomb necklace 1
I asked Véronique about her creative process. “When the idea is there, I have to find the source material, and usually make it into a mold. As I only work from organic textures, I have to preserve them to be able to work with them even in winter, when they are buried deep in snow. After the mold is ready, I experiment, try, and test. As soon as I find the form and the finish that I wish to bring out, I go for it. Thus a new collection starts to see the day; quite simply. The process rarely involves designs or notes, but is mainly created in my mind and by taking action. This is also similar to how I live my life. If I have an idea, I have to put it into action as quickly as possible; otherwise, the idea loses its breath and lustre. Living with the passion of the moment!”

Véronique likes to keep her creative process somewhat separate from the rest of her life. “I am in the workshop to for the creation process, whereas I have an office at home for complementary processes such as packing online orders for mail,” she explained. “The workshop is the place where magic takes place, and each piece is created from A to Z. While I try to keep regular weekday work hours, in the period of exhibitions (about 15 shows a year) I usually work double time! You can call me someone organised in chaos, which is clearly reflected in my workspace. Forget the Pinterest image of a well decorated workshop, mine is quite far away from that. I make a big clean-up three times a year (!!!)”Workshop1

I asked Véronique to describe her style. “I like to follow trends from a safe distance as I don’t like them to influence my work. Trends come and go, changing in the blink of an eye, and sometimes enjoying rebirth after many years; whereas I prefer to create by remaining true to myself; thus my pieces remain timeless. I consider my style to be timeless, organic, and even pagan to a degree! Simplicity and beauty of nature is reflected on each piece.”

Véronique uses several other techniques in the production of her work in addition to metal clay. “I make my own earring hooks and rings. I recently started collaborating with a company where I have some of my pieces cast in .925 Sterling Silver. This new way of working allows me to give more time for the creative process while somewhat cutting down on the time required for production. A few pieces of my Oak Bark collection will also be offered in gold as of 2016 summer, thanks to a jeweller working with traditional techniques who helped to open a door for a new path!”

I asked Véronique what she does to relax. “Travel, discovering new places, new faces,” she began. “Last year, I had the chance to visit Costa-Rica. This summer, I intend to visit Turkey, and I dream about visiting Spain next year. This, for me, is a way to open the gates for inspiration and restoring the energy that is somewhat depleted come spring (winters are long in Québec). Therefore, I prepare my backpack and hit the road. I also like to read and go to music shows.” I asked her if she wore her own jewellery when she is travelling, or even day to day. “I love jewellery, I create them, but I only wear small bronze studs,” she laughed.

So where does Véronique see herself going with her jewellery creation? “I would simply like to continue finding inspiration,” she said. “Sometimes, around the month of January, I feel like the well is dried up and I will never have any more ideas! It is winter. The high season of shows has just ended, the excitement has waned, and I feel the need to think about the spring and new collection ideas. I ask myself whether I will be able to find new ideas, and continued inspiration is what I wish with all my heart!” She sells her work in several places. “I sell online, through my Etsy shop. My creations can also be found in several stores that sell works of Canadian creators. And I sell in exhibitions all over Québec and Ontario. I believe that by participating in shows throughout Québec and Ontario, I help demystify this material in the eyes of the public and traditional jewelers. I hope to continue doing this and presenting my creations while introducing the material so that one day people will get to know it better. I see myself continuing to work with this material as long as I have fun doing it, because, above all, it is the pleasure that keeps the passion going!” Absolutely!

Finally, I asked Véronique what she is currently working on. “At present, I am working on my Oak Bark collection as well as a small series of jewellery created from Lilac twigs.”Lilac Twig silver ring

It was such a pleasure to spend a little time getting to know Véronique and I look forward to seeing her new work in the years to come. To find out more about Véronique, visit her here…
www.brelokz.com www.facebook.com/Brelokz.Bijoux

www.instagram.com/brelokz https://www.etsy.com/shop/Brelokz

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JULIA RAI is a teacher, writer and artist working in a variety of media. She is the director of the Metal Clay Academy and runs the Cornwall School of Art, Craft and Jewellery. She finds inspiration in science fiction and fantasy and loves a good story where disbelief can be suspended in favour of wonder. Her practical and ultra-organised side is always vying for attention alongside her creative and messy side. Each is trying hard to learn from the other and live in harmony.

Ow!!! Is Your Work Hurting You?

One night I tossed and turned in bed, sore…so sore. I started think about my day and to try to diagnose the causes for my pains.  My hands hurt.  That is easy to figure out…I work with my hands.  While I’ve had TWO carpel tunnel surgeries, my hands and wrists still hurt and still go numb.  I found this article about exercises for hands.  It reminded me that my hands and wrists would benefit from stretching and flexing exercises. I am trying several of their suggested exercises in the morning before I get out of bed.hands

My back and neck hurt too.  “Oy! The pain in my neck and back are killing me.”  Okay, maybe a little dramatic.  I was complaining to a friend who figured that my bench is too high.  I made my bench…it’s a Franken bench—and in theory it would be easy to cut some off the 2×4 legs.  Having tried this in the past and unsuccessfully cut each leg the same… I’m looking into a higher chair or a chair that adjusts better.  My studio chair was a road side find…so I’m sure there are better chairs to be found. franken desk 1

My body also hurts due to decisions I made while in my twenties such as jumping out of “perfectly good planes” with a parachute in the army. I have aches and pains that make sitting for long periods impossible.  To compensate I’ve learned to do many tasks standing up. I added a rubber gym mat where I stand to work, that helped.  And I added more lights—this may sound strange but more lighting improved my posture!  I wasn’t working at weird angles to get the best light.

Where I store my tools is also important to help keep my body happy.  I have a small studio and so I take advantage of all and any areas for storage.  Under my bench I put a set of drawers.  I added wheels and some pegboard to the side.  The idea was that I could pull it out of the way while using the bench and it would provide handy storage.  That is the theory.  In practice–I haven’t the room to pull it out, so I work squished to the left of the bench, the tools on the peg board are hard to get.  (Don’t ask me how many times I’ve dinged my head on my bench pin as I bent over and down to get a tool!)  Having tools handy is obviously important.  I think I’ve held on to this “system” too long and despite the time I spent building it and painting…it has to go.

I hope I’ve started you thinking about where you work and how you work.  For further reading, I recommend this paper that was presented at the 2010 Sante Fe Symposium on the topic of studio ergonomics for jewellers.  In the article, the authors show many examples of solutions from jewellery studios.

540704_577388125607677_846842341_nJeannette Froese LeBlanc is the editor at Cre8tiveFire.com and a jewellery artist. She is definitely “A glass 1/2 full kind of person”. She has learned to enjoy the journey and not solely focus on the destination, which is something her kids taught her.  Look down, look around, enjoy where you are.

 

Project: Miniature Jugs In Silver Metal Clay by Sue Heaser

1.2 extract images_Page_28_Image_0001aI always have loved jugs and I have a much-loved collection of milk jugs in all shapes and sizes. It was natural that I should want to make miniature jugs in pure silver! The project instructions will make a jug about ½” (13mm) high,which is equivalent to 6” (15cm) tall in the standard dollhouse scale of 1:12. These little jugs also look wonderful hanging on a charm bracelet.

The secret to sculpting small miniatures in metal clay is to make the rough shape of the object in fresh clay, dry it, and then refine the shape with sanding, repairing imperfections with paste as necessary.