Respect–A rant about the tiered classification of artists by artists.

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– Respect- Aretha Franklin. Song written by Otis Redding Album: I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You [1967]

 

“R-E-S-P-E-C-T
Find out what it means to me” Aretha Franklin

~Sigh…respect. Or in this case the lack of respect. Why do artists sometimes feel superior over another artist simply because of the media or the type of art of another artist? I’ve had THREE separate conversations this week with other artists where this topic has come up.

One artist is a graphic designer by day and a singer/songwriter by night. She is often asked if she compromises her singing for her 9-5 day job. And her answer is no. Why can’t she do both?

Another friend is at an art show. I would classify her as a jewellery designer. But within the jewellery making community there are tiers of respect given and received based on the type of metal you work in, the type of tools you use…and so on. She was upset over a conversation she’d had with another jewellery designer.  The other jewellery designer felt that my friend’s work is “artsy” and not “real jewellery design” and therefore should not be in the same category of the same show as their work.

index22Are we going round and round the same old conversation of “Artist Vs. Crafts person” or “Designer Vs. Artist”? ~Yawn. I remember these conversations from “back in the day” when I was a potter. I have just realized…I was called a “potter” even though I hardly ever made any actual pots! I wasn’t ever upset about this title—I worked in clay. Those who made tea-pots were potters, those who made thrown clay sinks…potters. Those who hand-built slabs of clay—potters. But I remember when this need to define came up in my circle. I think it was the late ‘90’s at the “One of a Kind Show”. Some potters had their shorts in a bunch that the show had “allowed” those who paint on bisque ceramics into the show. Egad…they poured liquid clay into molds—purchased molds. And then painted glazes on them. How would the public know that “OUR” pottery was “real” pottery? Painted bisque-ware was a lower class pottery.math_vs_design Continue reading…

Thinking of Selling Your Work Online?

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At some point, every jewellery artist wonders where they should sell their work. Several of my artist friends sell their work in big shows, with big travel and booth costs. But their work is at that level. Collectors all over the world love and buy their jewellery. I’m not at that level! I dream of that level.

Right now, I’m thinking that I’m making a big step to put my work online! After years of promoting the work of other artists through Metal Clay Artist Magazine…I somehow stopped making my own jewellery. Editing and publishing an independent magazine that was available on newsstands world wide was a big job. We had a great team and did an excellent job. But I put my “all” into the magazine, all the time. My studio gathered dust, then it gathered junk. I reclaimed it this past summer. I started to make some jewellery! Continue reading…

Open Shelf Firing Base Metal Clays by Martha Biggar

 

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I recall so clearly when I first heard about metal clay, back in the late 1990s, in the Rio Grande catalog. I thought I might like to work with it, and took my first class in 2000 (a two-week stint at Arrowmont in Tennessee, with Linda Kaye-Moses). I also recall, equally clearly, hearing about and then using Metal Adventures’ (Original) BRONZclay, when it came on the market in 2008. Such an interesting and different take on metal clay!

And look at us now: we have several versions of silver clay, plus a multitude of base metal clays, with more coming. What Bill Struve started experimenting with in 2006 has grown into an international community of inventors and users, with clays coming from many parts of the world. While I am personally far from a scientist, I do have an inquisitive nature that wants to know many things about the materials we use.

Most of us are aware of some differences in the base metal clays, like color and shrinkage rate. I’ve taught many classes that help others get the feel of different clays, but never went beyond the basics where firing is concerned.   This is the subject of my latest set of experiments, and this article deals specifically with open-shelf firing of base-metal clays; torch firing is the subject for my next major experiment and another article. Continue reading…

Now You See It, Now You Don’t… Transforming Your Workspace by Yvonne Kuennen

    

When you work with metal clay, you tend to fall in love with this medium because it takes up so little space. It is extremely portable and a very small toolbox will hold most of your tools. Many of the basic tools are common things you might find in your kitchen or around the house. Miniature rolling pin, cookies cutters, picks, emery boards, brushes, etc. are some examples of basic tools. In no time at all, the tools multiply, and, before you know it, take over a portion of your house. The other people who share that living space are forced to give it up. It really is unfair – to everyone concerned. (Pictured is Yvonne’s Kitchen/Studio.)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It is a challenge to organize so many tiny tools. You can’t have too many tools or too many beads (everyone knows that). The question is, how do you know what to let go of? You can’t know what to let go of until you assess what you have. In my study of feng shui, I ran across a book entitled, “Clearing the Clutter,” and then I attended a workshop on the same topic. It turns out the basic premise or use for feng shui is in the clearing of spaces. The best tip I learned for weeding “stuff” out of your life was one about creating three boxes or bins with the labels: donate/re-purpose, pitch and keep. The trick for me was getting the boxes to the thrift store or the trash before I got a chance to pull things back out. Keep telling yourself, “less is more.” It is so true. Continue reading…

Artist Profile: Kathleen Nowak Tucci By Julia Rai

 

Alabama Gulf Coast eco-artist Kathleen Nowak Tucci was featured on the cover of the controversial oil-spill issue of Italian Vogue magazine in August 2010. It was the first time an eco-artist’s work had been featured on the cover of a mainstream fashion magazine.Vogue Cover Tucci wwwcre8tivefirecom

Kathleen has been creating art for 25 years and recently has begun working with recycled bicycle inner tubes. This work with recycled rubber has brought her to the attention of a number of prestigious magazines, such as Vogue Italia (cover!), Marie Claire, Elle Decor, Ornament, and Interior Design, and high-end boutiques and galleries across America. “My work was also recently included in the Smithsonian Craft Show 2011,” she said. “There were 1300 entries and only 120 juried artists.”

Kathleen Nowak Tucci wwwcre8tivefirecomK Nowak Tucci wwwcre8tivefirecomKathleen has always been creative. “I have no choice but to be creative,” she explained. “Even as a child, I always had some art project going. On both sides of my family there were very creative women.” Continue reading…

Molded glass clay cabochons By Paula Radke

Beauty_Flower buttons3Glass clay is fairly new on the clay scene. Like metal clay, it can be molded and/or sculpted and, after drying and being fired in a kiln, it undergoes a seemingly magical transformation. But instead of textured, sculpted or molded solid metal, glass clay transforms into textured, sculpted or molded solid glass! Easy to use and inexpensive, it comes in powdered form in a wide range of colors (opaque only). You can use your glass clay cabochons as you would use any fused glass cabs, such as in the hinged bracelet project or the mixed media bracelet.

Author and photos except those noted: Paula Radke
Editors: Jeannette Froese LeBlanc, Margaret Schindel and Ann Davis
Photos 1-3: Ann Davis

Experience Level: Beginner

Advertise/Sponsor Creative Fire

 

creative-fire_v1Creative Fire is proud to enter its 2nd year! Out of the ashes of Metal Clay Artist Magazine rose Creative Fire with thanks to the efforts and funding from our readers and founding sponsors PMC Connection and Mitsubishi. We are pleased with the results of our first year and we look forward to many more years inspiring metal clay and jewellery makers.

Shifting from a paid print periodical to a free online site has been a learning experience, but through it all we have discovered the joys of online publishing. Having instant feedback from readers is amazing. The ability to quickly put out information about new products and ideas keeps us on our toes! Our founding sponsors have made it possible for our site and all of the tutorials and information to be free at any time to anyone.  No paid subscriptions!

Our focus remains on metal clay, but like any artist we dabble in other aspects of jewellery making including polymer clay, enamel, wire work, and more. Our site is the place to go for inspiration, tips and tricks, product reviews and projects.

Who We Are: Led by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc, former publisher and editor-in-chief of Metal Clay Artist Magazine, our team includes other former magazine staff members as well as contributions by international artists and writers.

Where to Find Creative Fire:
In addition to our site: www.cre8tivefire.com where we post several articles weekly, we post daily on Facebook, Twitter and now Pinterest. Artists in our community are administrators on our social media sites and so we have a variety of voices and interests.

We have several avenues for sponsors:
Site Sponsor, Page Sponsors, Individual Projects, Sidebar ads, Text links, Website Links,  Editorial Article/Feature.

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Please contact us for information about reaching the international metal clay audience.
Jeannette Froese LeBlanc (Cre8tiveFire@gmail.com)

One Hinged Bracelet, Two Choices of Materials Part 2 of 2 Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

beautyIn this article, I will show you how to make a metal clay hinged bracelet with wire bezel-set glass clay cabochons that you can buy or make yourself using Paula’s project. In a previous post I showed you how to make a polymer clay version.

Note: Project assumes some previous soldering experience. If you are new to soldering, you may want to pick up a copy of Joe Silvera’s book, Soldering Made Simple: Easy techniques for the kitchen-table jeweler (Kalmbach Books, 2010) before trying this project.

Author and How-To Photos: Jeannette Froese LeBlanc
Edited by: Margaret Schindel and Joy Funnell
Beauty Photo: Lisa Barth
Illustrations: Roxan Waluk

Experience Level: Intermediate-to-advanced

Why I hate New Year’s Resolutions…

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I hate New Year’s Resolutions simply because there seems to be this mass need to redefine, redesign and analyze our errors in order to improve our lives. What if things are pretty good and we just want to carry on?

I feel that the driving force behind New Year’s resolutions is that you look for what is bad about yourself or your life, or maybe your art or studio. I get that. I worked really hard on totally cleaning out my studio last summer. My studio was not working for me, it was cluttered and full of stale ideas. But I had to forge ahead on it on my own terms, at my own time. New Year’s resolutions feels like a forced march to me. Continue reading…

Metal Clay Textures Are Everywhere You Look! By Margaret Schindel

TexturesOne of the key reasons for choosing metal clay as a jewelry making material is that it allows you to create or reproduce virtually any texture in metal quickly and easily.

What Can You Use to Add Texture to Metal Clay?

Although it sounds clichéd, you really are limited only by your imagination. There is a dizzying selection of commercial plastic, polymer or silicone texture mats and sheets, rubber stamps, texture rollers, molds, etc. that you can purchase to impress patterns in fresh clay. There also are many different ways to make your own one-of-a-kind texturing materials and tools. You can use water etching, carving, drilling, filing and metal clay appliqué on dried clay. After firing you can use traditional metal working techniques such as hammering to alter the topography of the metal’s surface. Continue reading…