“Tis The Season” by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

indexWith the passing of Thanksgiving in the USA came “Black Friday”.  This is supposed to be the average day where retailers have covered their costs for the year and the remaining days of the year are profit making.  I don’t know if that same profit/income expectation can be applied to studio artists.  When I was “doing the show circuit” the money I made at Christmas shows set me up for the year.  A bad Christmas show meant it would be a pretty lean year ahead.

I’ve been seeing artists post a variety of comments lately about their sales.  Some people are over the moon with their sales and others are wondering where their customer base went.  I wish I had the information so many are asking for. “Where are my customers?” “Why are people not buying?” Others are working their fingers to the bone as they are afraid to turn away sales for fear of not knowing if this is their “moment” or if this is a sign that they have reached the right market. I too am trying to balance the extra orders that come with “the season” and actually enjoying the season.one-of-a-kind-show

A few artist friends have mentioned how bold customers are getting asking for discounts.  Oh I know how difficult that is to deal with when you are put on the spot.  You want to make a sale, but not at that price. An artist who sells only online says that online customers are even bolder and will ask for 50% discounts.  Sometimes even asking for free products in exchange for an article or promotion.  The internet seems to give people a veil to hide behind as they are not saying things to the person’s face.  An experienced artist once told me not to lower my prices and not to bend to the pressure of discounts.  She said that it was so easy to go down in prices, but to bring them back up is harder.  If your new low price is known, it becomes your new price.

As the time before the holidays speeds up and patience runs thin, this is a great time for you to set your business apart from the rest.  Instead of just making a sale–go above and beyond with your customer service.  Did you know that there were trends in customer service?  Me neither!  I found this article about it.  Things to think about adding to the service you give your clients:

  • Make it easy for customers to get help from real people;
  • Obsess over every detail of the customer experience;
  • Be proactive, and don’t wait behind a desk for customer contact

The last point is a good one…ask your customers for feedback.  Sounds scary.  But it is a great way to learn ways to modify designs, packaging, shipping…etc.  I’ve done this in the past and have turned a few buyers into friends. I took their advice and modified my jewellery designs.  Win-Win for both of us.

22No matter where you are selling your work this year, I wish you prosperous sales and happy customers. Try to enjoy the season.  As my grandfather would say- “This too shall pass.”

 

headshotsmallJeannette Froese LeBlanc is a studio artist living in Rural Ontario Canada.  She is inspired by the landscape and history of Canada.  The structure of trees inspires her as much as people’s portraits.  Both are re-occurring themes in her jewellery and photography. To see more of her work please follow her on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sassyandstella/

English Pendant Ocarina by Carrie Michael

orcana

The ocarina is an instrument that still remains beautiful today but connects us to the very roots of art and music. With this project, I will share how I make a whistle from metal clay, and then tune it to create a musical instrument.

Project: Carrie Michael
Photos and illustrations: Carrie Michael
Editing: Joy Funnell and Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

CJS Sales in New York City – A Designers Quarry By Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

mcam-5-3_page_14_image_0001Imagine chatting about the history and the future of jewelry design while sitting in a warehouse stacked floor to ceiling with boxes and boxes of mostly vintage beads and jewelry making components. What an astounding wonderland of inspiration! I met with Carl and Elyse Schimel, co-owners of CJS Sales in New York City, one of my favorite places to head for a creative boost.

(Image: Wire wrapped stone necklace design by Carl Schimel.)

The CJS Sales warehouse is located on 36th Street between 5th and 6th Avenues in New York City. Savvy jewelry designers can spend hours poring through this extraordinary trea-sure trove that holds literally millions of vintage beads and jewelry making supplies with limitless design potential. The Schimels are constantly seeking out great buys on anything that might be used for making jewelry and accessories.

“We bought a chandelier store that went out of business…[and] a rhinestone factory. We try to keep things that will be inspiration for people and [are] also unusual and different. We price at what we bought it at, so you can get quality vintage parts that are not found on today’s mar- ket at great prices,” said Elyse. To help designers compete and allow their work to stand out, Elyse and Carl sell only to wholesale customers who come to the warehouse. “We do not sell on the internet or show broad images. We do this to protect our buyers. Our customers are very knowledgeable. We believe in promoting design- ers, fostering new ones, to give them an edge.”

mcam-5-3_page_14_image_0002

(Image: The Milwaukee Sentinel – July 31,  1969)

As a jewelry maker, I marvel that Carl stayed constantly ahead of the curve with his fashion-forward jewelry designs for more than 50 years. It was fascinating to listen to him talk about why he created the line and the manufacturing hurdles he had to overcome to get “Kim Crafts- men” jewelry out to buyers.

I was curious about how the Kim Craftsmen showroom and design space morphed into this vast warehouse of jewelry making supplies.

Elyse explained, “When Carl was liquidating [his jewelry manufacturing business] I started cold calling people. He thought it was cute [and] he was giving me a 100% commission. I started to bring in big accounts, he started to buy [at] fire sales and we started a wholesale liquidation business.” Carl adds, “If I had to describe the business I’d say it is a designer’s quarry. Designers come here to dig out treasures.”

I can personally attest to the digging! When I pay Carl and Elyse’s warehouse a visit, I come prepared by dressing as if I were to go climbing, I bring a rolling suitcase (after one visit where I lugged 30 lbs of beads in a shoulder bag thirteen blocks in NYC) and of course water and a cell phone—in case I get lost or to keep track of time. Losing a day in here is an easy thing to do!

As Elyse showed Art Deco glass beads, unfinished brooch components from the 1950s and mouth-blown glass beads, her father talked about how the artist’s hand should be apparent in his or her work. Carl used the term analog to explain how he worked. “To me [using] a pencil is analog. When you write with a pencil there’s pressure, there’s a difference in how it looks. You can write the same thing ten times…it will be the same each time but [also] different. When I caged stones using wire wrapping the concept being used was ‘mass individuality’; everyonecould have a caged stone but all of them were different.” Today he is intrigued by the idea of what he might have made if metal clay had been on the market when he was making fashion jewelry. “What happens is, as an artist you use the materials that are available at that time in the best ways that you can. But can you imag- ine what Alexander Calder would have done if [metal clay] had been available to him?”

mcam-5-3_page_15_image_0001

Elyse models one of her father’s body jewelry pieces. This image is reminiscent of a photo from a 1969 newspaper article about his work.

Calder, a world renowned sculptor best known for inventing the hanging kinetic sculp- ture form known as a mobile, had a tremendous influence on Carl’s jewelry design. “When I got his…enormous book of jewelry it showed him working in his studio…a lot of his style of jewelry was much more understandable to me. He wasn’t using goldsmith tools, sized for jewelry making. His tools were large anvils with heavy handles, blacksmith tools, as he was used to making large mobiles and stabiles so there’s immediacy to the way Calder worked, and it showed in his work. If you look at his pieces, there’s a freshness still to his work. You can feel the hand, the way he twisted and moved to create his pieces. That’s analog!” Carl exclaimed. “You can always recognize his tools…for example if he used a hammer with a scratch on it, it would show on his piece like a fingerprint.” Carl went on to explain how metal clay is analog. “It is hands-on. In an age where a tremendous amount of design is going digital, the look is just opposite—180 degrees opposite. I’m sure [the artists using digital design tools] are very, very fine designers. It doesn’t look like jewelry that I’m used to. Metal clay takes me back to when we made jewelry. And we wanted to call it ‘Artistry in Metal’ because at that time, in the 50s and 60s and 70s, bench designers sat down and worked with the material, they under- stood the material. Metal clay is another vehicle for artists to express themselves. It is a phenomenal material….”

mcam-5-3_page_16_image_0001 mcam-5-3_page_16_image_0002

(Photos of jewelry by Kim Craftsmen, a company owned by Carl Schimel and his brother.)

I couldn’t agree more! Combine metal clay with some of the vintage beads and findings at CJS Sales and you’d have an exquisite combination of a modern material matched with vintage beads. If travel to New York City is not an option, seek out your own local charity, “antique” shops, or online for vintage elements to add to your own jewelry. When I find my creativity waning, a visit here spurs new ideas in new directions. It is like going to a museum for in- spiration, except that here you can take home the items that inspire you and use them in your work! Elyse showed me old pedals from a ma- chine. I forget what machine they were for because I was focused on the typeface used for the logotype imprinted on them! Inspiration for a new line of necklaces, perhaps? Now how to explain to the TSA agents at the airport that I need to bring home a half dozen metal pedals even though I have no idea what they are for!

RESOURCES:

CJS Sales: www.cjssales.com, 16 West 36th Street, 2nd floor, between 5th and 6th Aves., New York, New York 10018 (212) 244-1400

To view images of Kim Craftsmen jewelry: www.costumejewelrycollectors.com/kim- craftsmen-gallery/

To read more about Carl Schimel’s jewelry manufacturing business: http://www.costumejewelrycollectors.com/ 2013/03/28/a-tale-of-two-brothers-part-1-by- molly-felth/

To view images of Alexander Calder’s jewelry: http://www.pinterest.com/lizzieiom67/ alexander-calder-s-jewellery/

To view the The Milwaukee Sentinel – July 31, 1969 article: http://news.google.com/newspapers? nid=1368&dat=19690731&id=K3RQAAAAIBAJ& sjid=NREEAAAAIBAJ&pg=7278,6232783

Photos from inside CJS Sales many rooms: Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

headshotsmallJeannette Froese LeBlanc is a studio artist living in Rural Ontario Canada.  She is inspired by the landscape and history of Canada.  The structure of trees inspires her as much as people’s portraits.  Both are re-occurring themes in her jewellery and photography. To see more of her work please follow her on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sassyandstella/

The Agony of Writing an Artist Statement by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

artist-statement-audience-1024x617

It is very hard for some artists to write an artist statement and it is sometimes equally hard for others to read.  It is easier to write a bio and to tell others where you’ve been and what you’ve done.  But it is so much harder to explain why.

Having an artist statement prepared is a great way for customers to connect with your work and it gives shops and galleries “sound bites” to use to promote your work. After having suffered through the agony of writing my own artist statement I can tell you that the most important thing about an artist statement is the process of writing one.  I found it helped me sort out my own artistic history and methods.  It has helped me to  clarify the direction of my work and it has jump started a new body of work. Despite already knowing how important one was to have, it’s not something I’d written for myself.

calvins-artists-statementI was recently in the position where I had to send in my artist statement.  500 words.  Five.Hundred.Words. OY! I procrastinated for a few days.  Then I cut and pasted bits of things I’d written.  I sent it in.  And was told, “This is not an artist statement”.  I knew that, but found the exercise very difficult.  I’m not one to ever stand up and say, “I did this and it is awesome.” I needed help, so naturally I did some research.

A friend of mine pointed me to this site: http://www.gyst-ink.com/artist-statement-guidelines/ this one is good too: http://www.artstudy.org/art-and-design-careers/sample-artist-statement.php

I rewrote my artist statement. (After I raided my kids’ trick or treat bags, walked the dog, tidied my studio…procrastination is one of my rituals before writing.) I read some guidelines about artist statements and I started over. I hope my new version is a real artist statement.  And I hope that when you need to write one you can remember that they are very hard for most artists to write—give yourself a break.

 

20161025_1410491Jeannette Froese LeBlanc is a studio artist living in Rural Ontario Canada.  She is inspired by the landscape and history of Canada.  The structure of trees inspires her as much as people’s portraits.  Both are re-occurring themes in her jewellery and photography. To see more of her work please follow her on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sassyandstella/

Metal Clay 101- Carving Metal Clay by Dona Miller

mountain-ring-wet-carvedWet, dry, push, pull. Whatever method you choose, with time and a little practice you can create beautifully carved metal clay.

Carving in wet clay can give you curved edges and a sculptural feel. (See opening photo.) The clay is wet and the tools used are generally soft and rounded.  Wet clay added to wet clay can be shaped by pushing the clay into place.  Large amounts of wet metal clay can be cut off and small amounts brushed off with a wet brush.  Often artists working “wet on wet” will simply brush each side of clay to be joined with a swish of water from a paint brush. Just about any tool can be used with wet metal clay and most people like to use traditional clay carving tools. In general carving wet clay involves a pulling technique, where the tool is being pulled toward you to remove clay. Another way to think about it is that the clay you are removing is moving toward you. Fortunately, clay carving tools are readily available and inexpensive.

catbones-broach-dry-carvingThe method that I prefer is carving dry clay, which creates crisp, clean lines even on textured surfaces. (See Cat Tail Brooch photo.)I use micro wood carving tools to do this. When using a wood carving tool, you will be using a pushing motion to remove clay. The clay you are removing will be coming off the tool in front of your tool. Keep in mind, you can achieve a slightly different result depending on whether you carve into leather hard or fully dry clay. Fully dry clay will create more resistance which can give you more control, especially when you are first starting.

I generally use a pencil to draw my carving lines if I am doing a detailed carving or I want very crisp, specific cuts in my clay. If I want a more organic look, I will only mark starts and stops for my lines. I will then do a very shallow carve to create a guide for the tool when I am carving deeper. This allows me to move the first cut along a line, easily seeing my marks in front of the tool. After the shallow groove is in, I let carving tool to track in the groove while making the deeper cuts.

The trick to nice clean carvings is to remove a little clay at a time. You can always remove more clay, but it is often difficult to cleanly add clay back where you have removed too much. Also, make sure your piece has good support under it where you are carving. If you are carving a domed piece, leave the piece on the form while carving.

As always, safety is key when you are carving. Clay carving tools can be sharp and pointy and can easily injure if you are not paying attention. If you are using wood carving tools, note that these are extremely sharp and placement of your hands so the tool is always moving away from your fingers is important.

Once you have control of your carving technique, you can carve shallow, intricate designs. You can also take a completely different approach and create negative spaces by carving all the way through a layer of clay to make an open space. The sky’s the limit. Enjoy!

donaDona’s love of jewelry began as a child, sitting on the floor for hours with her mom’s jewelry box. She began designing her own jewelry in high school and spent time studying the work of a jewelry designer and family friend. During her career in high tech, Dona traveled the world fascinated by the cultures and their use of color and texture.

After leaving the high-tech world, Dona returned to her love of jewelry design. Her work is influenced by the places she has lived and traveled, bringing the textures of nature into her designs. Her love of stones is featured in her one-of-a-kind pieces which showcase the stones she has collected.

Dona currently teaches classes in jewelry design and techniques. Her students continue to be an inspiration to her, fascinating her with the unique perspective each student has conceptually and artistically.
Dona is an award winning artist. Her work is featured in stores and galleries throughout the Northwest and in print.

Tutorial: Fine Silver Leaf Earrings by Jeannette Froese LeBlanc

leaf-beauty-shot-4x4I live in rural Ontario, Canada where autumn is the most glorious and colourful season. Once the leaves turn many colours, I start to think about making leaf jewellery. I was inspired by oak leaves for this project. Follow along with me and you can easily use your own favourite leaves to make earrings or a necklace pendant.

 

Here’s a link for the project: https://pmcconnection.com/education/projects/guide/name/fine_silver_leaf_earrings_by_jeannette_froese_leblanc.php

Thank you PMC Connection for sponsoring this project! Please note…the photos in the project link are tiny.  To enlarge photos please click on the image.

Enjoy!
Jeannette

P.S. If you make this project I’d love to see your work!  Send me an email with your image to: cre8tivefire@gmail.com

 

So you wanna sell your jewellery?? (Part 1)

12552325_163727650661795_2052323012_nLast month we ran a survey for our readers and there were some really great comments and questions.  One theme that repeated itself was about “making a living” at selling your work.

Here are a few of the reader questions:
“How can I make a living at my art?”
“How do you balance a personal life, regular work and creative time?”
“Does anyone make a living selling metal clay jewelry?”
“Can you make a living as an artist when you work with metal clay? This question could be asked to any “regular” person, like you and me ;)!”

I could have asked any of these questions! So I’m not the expert with the answers.  But I have done a bit of research and I have some resources to share. The first thing I’d like to address comes from a conversation about these very topics with my father.  He told me to “never pay too much for an income” and to “make a life, not a living”.  Sage advice from a person I admire.  I think his words address the question someone had about balancing work life and creative life. You can become a slave to your work even if it is your calling and by consequence miss out on family and friends. Many artists throughout history have sacrificed for their art. I have struggled with “work-life-balance” myself.  I’ve had to choose what is the most important–not just to me but to my family and so creative time often gets missed even though working in my studio is like breathing for me. I decided that I’d never regret giving the time to my children.  They won’t always be around but my many unfinished pieces of “art” will be there.index4

Question: “Does anyone make a living selling metal clay jewellery?”
Yes, I think there are artists who do!  However, given that the job of “artist” lacks a regular pay check, artists have to rely on many revenue streams. Artists living off their craft work hard at marketing their work, they sell on many platforms such as shops, online and shows, they teach, and most have varied jewellery lines and some sell products.  I would encourage you to find artists pages online, their sites and so forth and see how hard they work at “making a living”.

Question: “I would love to ask many of the high profile artists for more detailed information on how they achieved such name recognition/built their business in this community. And, if it supplies their full income, possibly even in the absence of a lot of travel teaching.”

This short talk by Paul Klein about finding your niche, removing obstacles and finding a mentor provides a great answer to the above question.

“Artist and career advisor Paul Klein emphasized the importance of being different.  He insinuated that distinctiveness generates sales–even more so than quality.  “Can’t all of us name artists who are doing really well monetarily, whose work we think sucks?”  The branded artist doesn’t necessarily produce better work, but more bankable work.” Quote from this article in Forbes.

In “Part 2” I’ll find answers to the questions about the nuts and bolts of business such as inventory, tracking, descriptions of work.

quote-to-make-living-itself-an-art-that-is-the-goal-henry-miller-130-94-16My closing comment is to be yourself.  I know that sounds so cliche. But it’s so true. I’ve been looking at metal clay jewellery for over a decade. (gasp) and I can almost without fail look at a photo of a piece of metal clay jewellery and tell you the name of the artist (and if I’m wrong–usually that person was the “inspiration” for the work). We need more work that stands out.  In another article I found on Forbes by Jessica Hagy she shows why weird can be bankable. Yes…be weird, but let your own distinct artistic voice show in your work!

Image credit for opening image: Location Pillar in the stairwell of the UT Austin Art Building was up for two weeks

JFL HeadshotJeannette Froese LeBlanc is working on becoming a distinct and profitable jewellery designer.  From her studio in rural Ontario, Jeannette tries to balance life as a mom of two (very) active children and earn a living from her jewellery.  You can find her work online and in several boutiques. www.SassyandStella.com

Artist Project Series: Gordon K. Uyehara

unnamed“The Artist Project Series” will feature 12 artists over the next year or so.  Each artist will let us look over their shoulder while they make a piece of art using EZ 960™ sterling silver metal clay.  As the master artists show their methods for making a piece, I hope that you are inspired and learn a new way of looking at metal clay. With thanks to the artists participating and to our corporate sponsor, Cool Tools.

Our first artist is Gordon Uyehara from Honolulu Hawaii. Recently he was interviewed by UK artist Julia Rai. Read her interview here.

In Gordon’s project, he shows how to make a Pangolin ring. It is an awesome piece of jewellery modeled after a very interesting animal. His project is quite timely too as countries have started to come together to sign a trade ban on Pangolins. (NY Times article.) Learn more about this animal. (Telegraph UK article.)

unnamed3Pangolin Metal Clay Ring by Gordon Uyehara

The pangolin has the unfortunate distinction of being the most trafficked animal in the world. Often referred to as scaly anteaters, these unusual mammals are hunted for their meat and tough scales that cover their bodies. Practitioners of folk medicine claim they are the cure for many human ailments. Pangolin scales are made of keratin, the same fibrous protein found in hair, horns, and nails. When threatened, a pangolin rolls itself into a ball so only its impenetrable scales are accessible. They can also emit a strong odor like a skunk. Pangolins are equipped with long, sticky tongues, and claws, in order to feed on ants and termites. All eight species of pangolin are on the endangered list due to poaching and loss of habitat. Two species of pangolin are considered critically endangered.

In this challenging sculpting project, I put the workability of the new EZ960 clay through its paces and feature the prehensile tail of a tree pangolin as a ring. The body is hollow form, while the tail is solid. This project idea could translate well to any animal with a similar clinging tail. My piece came out a little too bulky to be practical but the concept is valid. For a less intense experience, one may decide to choose a subject with less scales. The scale pattern would, however, look right at home on a dragon. EZ960 performed very well and made this project achievable without much ordeal.

Materials and tools:
EZ960 50g Sterling Silver Metal Clay
Polymer clay or any clay that hardens
Scribe or lettering tool
“v” micro carving tool or similar
crossing needle file
Ring mandrel and stand
Snake roller
Sandpaper and sanding paper
Clay shapers
Kiln paper
Vermiculite
3M radial bristles (blue, 400-grit)
Toothpicks
Paintbrush
Common metal clay tools

Process:

1) Sketch your design. The more complicated a project, the more important it is to do a sketch. It can help you decide how best to construct the project as well as help with proportions. A rough sketch is better than nothing and will improve the outcome of your project. Draw it out as many times as necessary until it looks correct. This also increases your understanding of the subject and you will improve your drawing skills the more you do it.gkupangolinringsketch

2) Make a model. Use modeling clay. This is like a rough three-dimensional sketch and will help determine the size of your piece. It doesn’t have to be nice or have much detail.gkuprocess2

3) Make a drying form. I used old polymer clay and based the size on my model. Whatever clay you use, make sure to test that the metal clay can release from it after drying. This will be for the hollow body of our animal. Remember, for sizing purposes, the metal clay will be laid over this drying form, and later the form will shrink during firing. Inspect the form from all angles and adjust as necessary. Bake or harden as per manufacturer’s instructions.gkuprocess3

4) Mark drying form. Bisect the drying form with a marker, so two halves can be created from it and then later joined to create the body.gkuprocess4

5) Make the body. Roll out clay to four cards thick on a non-stick sheet. Using the drying form as a guide, cut out a shape larger than one-half of the drying form. Lay clay over the form, gently press the clay to the form and trim to the bisection line. Press lightly until the clay stays on the drying form, while making sure not too thin the metal clay. Dry clay completely. A hair blow dryer or dehydrator is useful in expediting this process. Gently remove dried metal clay from the form and set aside. Repeat for the other half of the body.gkuprocess5a gkuprocess5b

6) Adjust the edges. Use a craft knife to whittle away any protrusions that prevent the sides from meeting nicely. It doesn’t have to be perfect.gkuprocess5c gkuprocess6

7) Join body halves together. Dampen the edges with water and use a thick paste made from the metal clay lump. Dry.gkuprocess7

8) Fill and smooth the seam. Roll a thin snake and moisten it. Position it over the seam and use a clay shaper to blend it into the seam. Smooth it further with a paintbrush. A lightly oiled fingertip sometimes helps with smoothing a wet surface. Similarly, fill any holes with moist clay. Dry as necessary.gkuprocess8

9) Correct body form. If necessary, add clay to adjust the shape to match your target form. Also remember, that the body form will be attached to the ring section later. Dry and smooth the entire surface with 400 and 600-grit sandpaper or the more flexible sanding papers. Do not thin the body form wall by over sanding.gkuprocess9agkuprocess9b

10) Make the legs out of metal clay. They can be hand shaped or created from cardstock stencils, like I did. I rolled the clay out to 8 cards thick. Dry and smooth the edges with sandpaper.gkuprocess10agkuprocess10b

11) Determine where the legs should be attached to the body and mark with a pencil if desired. Attach the feet with moist lump clay, dampened liberally with water and positioned between the pieces to be joined. Press the pieces together. Blend the extruded moist clay into the join with a rubber tip shaper and then a paintbrush. Dry. Fill the seam further with moist clay snakes. Smooth with sandpaper after drying so the limbs transition into the body form nicely.gkuprocess11a gkuprocess11b

12) Size the ring. Using a ring sizer, get a measurement of your finger. Add two and a half sizes (US) and position a strip of non-stick work surface on the ring mandrel for that size. Shrinkage may vary according to the shape of the ring. Tape the work surface strip to itself snuggly so it can be slipped off the mandrel later.gkuprocess12

13) Create a tapered snake. This is for the tail/ring section. Use an acrylic snake roller. It should be about 4-inches long. Remember the larger end will be attached to the body, so look at the form to get an idea of the size. When there is sufficient length to your snake, gently press down on it, rocking from side to side, to flatten it a little (a pangolin’s tail is more flat toward the end). Brush some water onto the tail form.gkuprocess13

14) Wrap the tail form around the mandrel. Position it over the non-stick work surface that you positioned earlier. Since the larger end will be attached to the body, it can be bent up a little. The rest of the tail should be wrapped nicely around the mandrel with the snake sides touching. Dry.gkuprocess14

15) After drying, slip the tail section off the mandrel and gently remove the non-stick surface from the clay. Fill in the inside seam of the tail with a moist snake of clay. Blend with a clay shaper and paint brush. Dry and smooth with sandpaper.gkuprocess15

16) Mark the design with a pencil, starting with the head and then moving back. Do it in sections since handling the piece as you carve tends to rub off the pencil marks.gkuprocess16

17) Carve along the pencil marks using a scribe and/or crossing needle file. On the larger design areas, use a mini v-gouge. Always make sure the area you are carving is supported with your fingers so it doesn’t flex. Define detail with the edge or folded edge of a piece of 400-grit sandpaper. Smooth with 600-grit sanding paper. Finish all the detail on the body up to where the tail will be joined.gkuprocess17a gkuprocess17c gkuprocess17bgkuprocess17d

18) Join the tail. Position the body next to the tail on the mandrel. To hold the body in place, I used some polymer clay on the mandrel. Later, the piece will have to be slipped off the mandrel so make sure the polymer clay lump isn’t stuck to well. Shape the tail end to match the body if necessary. I used a craft knife to remove some clay. Sand and give the tail its general shape before attaching. To join, dampen both sides. Liberally dampen a smashed lump ball of clay with water. Place it on the tail end and then gently push the body onto the tail. Blend any extruded clay back into the join area with a clay shaper and a paintbrush. Dry and fill as needed and then smooth with sandpaper.gkuprocess18a

19) Carve the tail. Continue with the carved design from the body into the tail/ring. Always support the area you are carving with your fingers and exercise patience so you don’t stress the joins.gkuprocess18b

20) Fire as per manufacturer’s recommendation. I fired a test piece first since I hadn’t fired this clay before. Satisfied with how the test piece came out, I prepared my pangolin for firing. Normally, for a piece of this size and weight, I would have supported it with just fiber blanket. However, since there were reports of fiber blanket sticking, I placed kiln paper pieces between the art and the fiber blanket. I placed the whole thing in a bowl of vermiculite to keep it together.gkuprocess20

21) Adjust the ring. If the ring became misshapen during firing, place it on a metal ring mandrel and gently tap it out with a leather mallet.

22) Finish the ring. Brush, patina, and polish as desired. I brass brushed and used 3M radial bristles (blue, 400-grit) for the harder to reach areas. Then I used a patina gel to darken it and a sunshine polishing cloth to bring contrast to the details.gkuprocess22a gkuprocess22b

unnamed1 unnamed2

 

gkubiopicAbout the artist: Gordon K. Uyehara continues to be a metal clay artist. In Hawaii, he seeks the wondrous in the mundane because he thinks it is there. He shares his findings on social media with the quite unfounded belief it is raising the collective consciousness. Some ideas venture out of his head and eventually manifest themselves as silver, bronze, or copper art. He strongly dislikes doing the dishes.

Artist Profile: Gordon K. Uyehara Interviewed by Julia Rai

indexMetal clay artist Gordon K. Uyehara has been a well-known presence in the metal clay community for as long as I can remember. He was always one of the first people to offer help and advice to newbies through the Yahoo metal clay forum which he also helped moderate. When I was setting up the Metal Clay Academy website in 2007, Gordon was one of the first artists I approached for permission to use images of his work on the site and he was instrumental in helping to get the project going.

e616081b3da1c51c74fa9dc2f9b82910The first time I actually met him was at a conference in the UK in 2008. Taking a class with Gordon is a study in clean and neat working! My workspace is always chaotic but my over-riding impression of watching Gordon’s demonstrations was how cleanly he worked. He is a quiet, thoughtful artist and teacher and being in his presence was a lovely, calming and supportive experience. Continue reading…

Artist Profile: Cindy Miller Interviewed by Julia Rai

2016-branch-with-labradorite-and-drops

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve been an admirer of Cindy Miller’s work for a long time so I was really happy to have the opportunity to find out more about her for this profile.

(Photo: “Branch with Labradorite and Drops” Necklace by Cindy Miller)

Raised in Alabama, Cindy is now a full-time studio artist. “I’m single and live in Athens, Alabama with my Maine Coon Cat Taz – she’s a big girl and ‘helps’ me a lot,” she smiled. “I have also been adopted by several feral cats that live in the neighborhood so I always have an escort to my car. I live on the Tennessee River next door to my sister and her husband.  They have created a beautiful retreat at the river and being there is very relaxing.”

cindy-miller-taz-helping(Photo: “Taz helping”)

Growing up in Huntsville, Cindy credits her parents for nurturing her creative spirit. “I’m not really sure how old I was but it must have been around five years old because I was sleeping on the top bunk bed (my sister got the bunk below),” she began. “I woke up one morning and decided to draw eyes all over the wall.  I can remember being fascinated with the shape of eyes and I guess this was how I was working through it in my mind. There must have been 50 eyes on the wall.  You can imagine the surprised look on my mother’s face when she came in to get us up for the day.  Luckily I had parents that were very patient when it came to creative expression.  I never got in trouble for drawing on the wall or cutting off my mom’s drapes to use as material for my doll’s clothing, or any number of things I did as a sprouting artist…they just made sure I had more art materials around.”

cindy-miller-french-court-necklace(Photo: “French Court Necklace” by Cindy Miller) Continue reading…